Opportunity Village Celebrated Groundbreaking for Innovative Park for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Opportunity Village
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 26, 2015

Opportunity Village Celebrated Groundbreaking for Sean’s Park on June 23

Clark County Commission Chair Steve Sisolak appeared alongside OV executives and board members
to commemorate building of new park for people with intellectual and physical disabilities

LAS VEGAS – On Tuesday, June 23, Opportunity Village celebrated the groundbreaking of Sean’s Park at the organization’s Ralph and Betty Engelstad Campus located on 6050 S. Buffalo Drive. Clark County Commissioner Chair Steve Sisolak, along with Opportunity Village executives Ed Guthrie and Linda Smith, and board member Mike Morrissey and his wife Patty, dug the commemorative golden shovels into the dirt in an empty lot behind the campus, which will soon be the home of Sean’s Park. The first of its kind in the U.S., the 2.5-acre project will create an innovative life-learning park for children and adults with intellectual and physical disabilities in the Las Vegas community. Recognized worldwide for setting precedence in care, service and programs for people with intellectual disabilities, Opportunity Village envisioned the park nearly six years ago, and now has the funding to turn the dream into a reality.

“Sean’s Park will be a model for the rest of the country, something very special and very unique,” said Linda Smith, senior vice president at Opportunity Village. “It really will bring acclaim to Las Vegas, to show that we have so much more to offer than The Strip. It’s a community full of generous people with huge hearts and a place that cares for everyone.”

Sean’s Park will offer new skill-building equipment such as a “live” street crosswalk, way-finding path, moonwalk pad, raised bed garden and many more. Overall, the park will present visitors with an opportunity to enjoy diverse activities and learn life skills that promote independence. The park is expected to be completed by Spring of 2016.
1
Photo #1
Clark County Commissioner Chair Steve Sisolak speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony of Sean’s Park at Opportunity Village’s Ralph and Betty Engelstad Campus on Tuesday, June 23, 2015.
2
Photo #2
Sean Morrissey, namesake of Opportunity Village’s Sean’s Park, greets the crowd along with his parents Mike and Patty at the park’s groundbreaking ceremony at the Ralph and Betty Engelstad Campus on Tuesday, June 23, 2015.
3
Photo #3
Opportunity Village CEO Ed Guthrie, Clark County Commissioner Chair Steve Sisolak, Mike Morrissey, Sean Morrissey, Patty Morrissey and Vadim Fridman from the Windsong Trust pose with ceremonial shovels to commemorate the groundbreaking ceremony of Sean’s Park at Opportunity Village’s Ralph and Betty Engelstad Campus on Tuesday, June 23, 2015.

About Opportunity Village
Mission: Opportunity Village is a not-for-profit organization that serves people within our community with significant intellectual disabilities, to improve their lives and the lives of their families.

Opportunity Village was founded in 1954 by seven families who were determined to give their children with disabilities the best lives possible. Now, more than 60 years later, Opportunity Village is one of the most recognized and respected organizations of its type in the United States.

Nevada’s largest employer of people with disabilities (who we call OVIPs), Opportunity Village serves nearly 2,000 individuals annually, providing vocational training, employment, habilitation and social recreation programs and services that make their lives more purposeful and interesting.

Opportunity Village citizens – individuals who were previously considered unemployable – work at Opportunity Village’s Employment Resource Centers and in jobs throughout the community, collectively earning wages amounting to more than $3.9 million in 2014. They are hard-working and diligent, proudly paying taxes and happily leading more fulfilling lives.

Primarily a self-funded organization, Opportunity Village generates the majority of its operational funding through its employment contracts and fundraising efforts such as the Magical Forest and Great Santa Run, saving Nevada taxpayers nearly $35 million annually.

###